Top Trump Administration Officials Are Set to Receive $10,000 Raises

US Senator from California Dianne Feistein flanked by her husband Richard Blum is sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence during the swearing-in re-enactments for recently elected senators in the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill

US Senator from California Dianne Feistein flanked by her husband Richard Blum is sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence during the swearing-in re-enactments for recently elected senators in the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill

While 800,000 federal workers are now either working without pay or furloughed and not entitled to retroactive pay, President Donald Trump's top appointees as well as Vice President Mike Pence are scheduled to get pay raises averaging about $10,000 per year on Saturday-and the shutdown is to blame for the glaring inequity.

The pending raises were a effect of the budget impasse and government shutdown: When the budget deal lapsed, so did an existing pay freeze for senior federal officials.

President Donald Trump had said at a press conference on Friday that he was considering asking top officials, including cabinet secretaries, to forgo the raises.

Without the salary caps in place, Pence is entitled to a $13,000 raise on Saturday, bringing his compensation to $243,500 per year.

Vice President Pence is in line for a raise of nearly $13,000 - leaping from $230,700 to $243,500. Others affected are under secretaries, deputy directors and other top administrators.

Democratic lawmakers, who are at an impasse with Trump over his vow to not reopen the government without funding for a wall along the Southwest border, earlier Friday put pressure on the Trump administration, criticising the potential raises.

Without legislation, the pay freeze was set to expire and pay was set to jump automatically.

House Speaker designate Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) talks to journalists following a meeting with President Donald Trump, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, and fellow members of Congress about border security at the White House in Washington on January 2, 2019.

The new Democrat-majority House passed two bills late Thursday that included no funding for the border wall but Senate Republicans said they wouldn't hold a vote since Trump indicated he wouldn't sign the legislation.

A senior administration official said the White House believes its likely Congress will act to reinstate the pay freeze when the federal government reopens. The Senior Executives Association, an organization that represents the highest-earning career government officials, estimates that the pay bump will cost taxpayers $300 million over 10 years.

"Unless extended by new legislation, the pay freeze will end", Weichert wrote to department and agency heads on December 28.

"At a time when more than 800,000 federal employees aren't getting paid, it is absolutely outrageous that the Trump administration would even consider taking advantage of the shutdown to dole out huge raises to the vice president and its political appointees", Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., the new chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, said in an email.

While the United States military and other major agencies are still fully funded, the impasse has left 800,000 government workers from other departments furloughed or working without pay.

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