Trump says he has no plans to fire Rosenstein

Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein

Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein

Rosenstein is joining Trump for an address to the annual convention of the International Association of Police Chiefs.

Illegal immigration is always a big part of that, from Trump's campaign promise to building a wall at the Mexico border, to eliminating sanctuary cities, the administration hopes a crackdown will reduce the crime rate. "Want to straighten it out fast, there's no reason for what's going on there". "So it works. Gotta be properly applied, but stop and frisk works".

Chicago police said last week that there have been 102 fewer homicides and almost 500 fewer shooting victims in the city this year, compared to the first nine months of 2017.

"Rudy Giuliani, when he was mayor of New York City, had a very strong program of stop and frisk, and it went from an unacceptably risky city to one of the safest city in the country and I think the safest big city in the country, so it works", Trump said.

"And Rudy Giuliani, when he was mayor of New York City, had a very strong program of stop and frisk and it went from an unacceptably risky city to one of the safest cities in the country and, I think, the safest big city in the country".

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was set to join U.S. President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One on Monday, a likely indication that his Justice Department job is at least temporarily safe following a chaotic two-week period that fuelled speculation he was preparing to resign or be fired. Rosenstein said he never pursued recording the President and denied any suggestion he advocated for Trump's removal. "No I don't, no", he said.

The ACLU found Chicago Police officers made more than a 250,000 stops from May through August 2014 without arrests, far more than in New York City at the peak of that police department's stop-and-frisk practices. "It works and it was meant for problems like Chicago".

In the fall of 2015, Emanuel contended during a closed-door meeting with then-Attorney General Loretta Lynch and 20 big-city mayors and police chiefs that police officers across the nation were becoming "fetal" because they're afraid their videotaped encounters with the public will end up on YouTube.

"We are pushing very hard to make sure that he comes in under oath to Congress and let the American people judge for themselves", House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows, R-N.C., told Fox News late last month.

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