Dianne Feinstein refers Kavanaugh matter to federal authorities

This senator might vote for Kavanaugh. So activists sent her 3000 coat hangers.

This senator might vote for Kavanaugh. So activists sent her 3000 coat hangers.

Dianne Feinstein has referred a confidential document that contains information on the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the senator announced Thursday.

The panel's top Democrat, Sen.

"It had been a chaotic morning", Kavanaugh wrote. "Mr. Guttenberg has suffered an incalculable loss".

Separately, the Judiciary Committee on Thursday delayed its vote on Kavanaugh until Sept. 20, with votes by the full Senate expected during the final week of September.

Instead of condemning the outrageous tactics of Judge Kavanaugh's opponents, and announcing their support for an objectively extraordinary nominee, Senators Manchin, Heitkamp, Donnelly, McCaskill, and Nelson are standing on the sidelines while Judge Kavanaugh's opponents resort to bribes, smears, and physical threats.

The conservative watchdog group is claiming he broke Senate rules by releasing confidential documents regarding Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey made the Bush documents public. If I had known who he was, I would have shaken his hand, talked to him, and expressed my sympathy. "Feinstein or anyone raised the specter of new "information" about him", White House spokesperson Kerri Kupec said in a statement. It also excluded any documents Democrats wanted to see from Kavanaugh's time as Bush's staff secretary. At Roll Call, Todd Ruger reports that "Senate Democrats have added a new line of attack against ..."

According to the Huffington Post, Feinstein is in possession of a document related to Kavanaugh's nomination that she has so far refused to share publicly, despite multiple requests from her fellow Democratic colleagues. "And I would have listened to him".

Kavanaugh also said he never asked Capitol Police to remove Guttenberg from the room, and was unaware if anyone had acted on his behalf to do so.

Booker is being criticized for releasing the documents, which the Judiciary Committee is holding on a confidential basis that makes them accessible only to senators. Wednesday's disclosure brings the total to 75.

Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa said there was precedent for invoking executive privilege, that President Reagan invoked it on the nomination of Justice William Rehnquist to be chief justice.

Feinstein has not shared details about the letter beyond her statement Thursday, and no other senators on the Judiciary Committee have been permitted to see it, according to reports.

Booker has welcomed the fight.

Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh testifies during the third day of his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on September 6.

Kavanaugh had more to say Wednesday about the moment he did not shake the hand of a Florida man whose daughter died this year in a school shooting - caught in a black and white photo that sped around social media - that made for one of the most dramatic moments of his confirmation hearings last week.

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