Measles outbreak hits 107 people, 21 states

Health officials warn we are on track for a more infectious year than usual with cases cropping up from coast to coast. The CDC says most of the 107 infections are reported in unvaccinated people

Health officials warn we are on track for a more infectious year than usual with cases cropping up from coast to coast. The CDC says most of the 107 infections are reported in unvaccinated people

CDC officials stated Tuesday that there have been 107 cases of measles already reported this year across 21 states, the majority of which having been diagnosed in children who have not been vaccinated.

Measles is common in Europe, Asia, the Pacific and Africa, officials say, and travelers with measles can spread the disease to people in the US who have not been vaccinated.

In 2017, 118 cases were reported.

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that spreads easily from an injected person by coughing, sneezing or even just breathing.

Measles typically begins with a high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes.

The Oregon Health Authority reported a person was contagious with measles when he or she rode the MAX Red Line on Thursday, Aug. 2, possible exposing other transit riders to the virus.

Measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000, meaning the disease was no longer regularly found in the country. In all, 527 people at CRMC were at risk of contracting measles.

How can you avoid getting measles?

Unvaccinated infants are especially vulnerable to complications of measles, so they are best protected by herd immunity, the CDC advises. Contraction is preventable by way of the MMR vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella. MMR vaccine is one of the required school immunizations in Indiana.

However, children who are under a year old, those with weakened immune systems, and those who never received the vaccine are still at risk for developing measles.

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