Hurricane John forms off Mexico's Pacific coast

Hurricane Hector

Hurricane Hector

There are now no coastal watches or warnings in effect. Tropical Storm Ileana also was growing while racing John up the coastline.

Tropical Storm John has strengthened into a hurricane in the Pacific off Mexico's western coast, though forecasters say it poses no immediate threat to land. Hurricane Hector, left, can be seen heading west toward Hawaii. The storm traffic for the rest of the season, which ends officially on November 30, won't be almost as robust, Philip Klotzbach, hurricane specialist at Colorado State University, which pioneered long-range tropical storm forecasting, said last week.

On the other side of the Pacific, Typhoon Shanshan is approaching Japan with maximum winds around 100 miles per hour.

According to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, the center of the hurricane was located about 225 miles south-southeast of Hilo, or 400 miles southeast of Honolulu.

Far out to sea, a strengthening Hurricane Hector was in the central Pacific as a strong Category 4 storm, with winds of 155 miles per hour (250 kph), the Center Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu reported.

Meanwhile, a bushfire on the Big Island doubled in size overnight and has burned through more than 600 hectares of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Surf along east-facing shores is already building and will peak later today and tonight, at 12 to 15 feet for the Big Island, mainly for the Puna and Ka'ū Districts. Higher than usual tides will combine with the large surf to increase the threat of coastal inundation.

Building subtropical high pressure north of Hector will keep the hurricane on a generally westward course the next several days.

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